Samir Rifai Appointed New Prime Minister Of Jordan

AP PhotoJust heard the news about an hour ago that Samir Rifai, who as of yesterday headed the Jordan Dubai Capital corporation, has been appointed as the next Prime Minister of Jordan. I don’t really know what to say about this piece of news. It is, from at least this citizen’s point of view, not the most optimistic news about the state of my country’s domestic affairs. It is something that gives me pause and it is news that makes me sigh disappointingly for several reasons that I hope to address later on. But, due to time constraints, I have nothing to offer as of this moment other than half-baked, first impression thoughts.

Hopefully I’ll come back with something a bit more analytical later in the day.

May God bless our country.

——

…A few hours after posting this I had to travel and I only now got a chance to check the comments and discussion evolving below. It’s pretty astounding to hear a lot of different voices from an interesting segment of Jordanian society, and that, to me, is a reflection of something that runs much, much deeper. At this point, I feel my voice has been fairly articulated in the midst of the ongoing discussion below, by several commentators.

The only thing I will add is that my disappointment over this appointment is made up of a variety of factors. We are a country whose only hope for salvation is to stem away from the tide of tribalism that has been the source of many of our problems – be it in the form of nepotism (wasta), the flawed electoral process, or in the guise of inherited positions. It is faulty on the part of any leader to preach to the public the values of democracy, meritocracy and even decentralization, and simultaneously appoint a man, who many will perceive to have inherited the position from his father, who remains a major player in the Kingdom’s legislative branch. Yes, Zeid Rifai has just resigned, but it took over four days for that to happen, which says to me that it took a while for someone to notice that a conflict of interest exists. In short, the signals the public gets are simply put, crossed, which leads to only one thing – an erosion of trust.

That said, I understand the difficulties associated with prime minister appointments, and regardless of what others might think or say, it is an important position in this country and it serves a noble purpose in government (it has yet to live up to that purpose but that’s another story). The problem is that, be it Samir Rifai or anyone else, I truly believe that it is this point who is given the helm to steer for a while is not as important as what we hope to accomplish from this journey. In other words, what is needed more than anything else is a dramatic paradigm shift in the way the political structure works in this country. The systems in place, or the lack there of, have been detrimental to this entire process. They are designed to be conducive of corruption and ensure failure, all of which falls at the expense of a single entity: the people.

At this point, any appointment of a prime minister and a new cabinet must come hand-in-hand with such a dramatic shift. Otherwise, two years from now, this same conversation will be taking place. The fall of yet another prime minister and the rise of another; the decline of yet another corruption-riddled government and the rise of another. And the cycle repeats itself.

Again, the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again while expecting different results. Does Jordan’s political process fit that description?

Last note, while I’m glad to host the evolving discussion below, and while I’m content to not see any of those zillion “mabrook!” comments that seem to flood Jordanian news sites “out of the blue” (to say nothing of newspaper congratulatories – I just want to remind people to help me out by voicing their critiques without going overboard. At the end of the day, I will be the one held accountable for what you say.

Axxia Technical Translations | Navitaslandandmineral

151 comments
Canada - Jordan
Canada - Jordan

Reply to Boston in the 80's... Kudos to you!! You were right on target. He was the same when I and Samir were living in the same area in Amman. He was rotten spoiled, controlling, manipulating because of who his father was, bragging how one day he will become PM in Jordan without having to even worry or prove himself to earn the post. He is obsessed with power and public positions and has an imature side with an ego... too bad for Jordan and the message his appointment sends to other Jordanians...

Boston in the '80s
Boston in the '80s

I found this forum when I was looking up the news of Samir becoming PM in Jordan, a friend from our college days in Boston had just told me about it and I couldn't believe it. It is refreshing to read this articles and your comments, I am not Jordanian, but fascinated by the position it has in the Middle East and it's history. I studied Political Science in Boston in the '80s and had many Jordanian friends back then. When I met Samir, I thought it was an incredible opportunity to talk to someone who's family was part of Jordan's history, so interesting !!...more like ,so disappointing... He was a nice person, but he just lived in another world. One of luxuries and favors, he went to Harvard because of who his father was, didn't go much to class, changed his BMW every year for a newer model, lived in a very nice apartment, went shopping in Milan every summer before arriving in Boston......this is the Samir I knew, nice person, well mannered and very ,very spoiled. The one serious political conversation we ever had ,ended when I asked him if there were any parties in Jordan....to which he answered : "Yes, we have lots of parties in Jordan...with great music and everything." He never got that I meant "political" parties..... Good luck, I loved reading this forum and it gives me hope to find a different view of Jordan, and such well educated people writing in it. I'll be checking it from my part of the world.

Canada - Jordan
Canada - Jordan

Greetings All! Thank God for this blog! It's one of the few where we can express ourselves freely with what's happening n Jordan nowadays. More to say in days to come... Regards,

Londoner
Londoner

a great article in herald tribune that desribes it as it is http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/23/world/middleeast/23amman.html?_r=1&scp=2&sq=jordan&st=cse AMMAN, Jordan — In recent days, King Abdullah II, popularly perceived in the West as being among the most enlightened Middle East leaders, has dismissed the prime minister and replaced him with a palace aide and loyalist, dissolved Parliament and postponed legislative elections for a year. The king’s decisions were widely seen here as an effort to free the government from a recalcitrant legislature so it could push through financial measures viewed as essential to shoring up an economy burdened by debt and deficit. The Parliament, dissolved midway through its term, had opposed cuts in spending and the reduction of business taxes, key components of the government’s financial plan. While King Abdullah often talks about human rights and democracy, the reality here is often quite different, rights advocates say. Last month the internal security forces were criticized by human rights groups when two prisoners died in custody. The king’s recent moves, while aimed at fiscal management, demonstrate the leadership’s continued intention to manipulate and suppress the political process, former officials and political commentators said. “The nature of humans is they want democracy,” said Ali Dalain, an independent member of the Parliament that was dissolved. “Since 1993, democracy in Jordan has been receding. One person cannot solve all problems and cannot make everyone happy, so people must share in determining their fate.” The king tried to blunt that criticism by ordering the government to rework an unpopular election law that limits the ability of voters to select their representatives. But even allies of the government conceded that there was little chance of substantially altering the law, which was instituted in 1993 to keep power out of the hands of certain groups, like the Muslim Brotherhood, an Islamist organization. “There are no fundamental changes; we should not be under any illusions,” said Nawaf Tell, a Foreign Ministry official who is director of the Center for Strategic Studies at the University of Jordan. “Yes, I read the newspapers; hopes are high, but this is not the case, that’s not what is going to happen.” The king’s credentials as a proponent of democracy were further undermined when he delayed legislative elections and then announced that there would be elections for new local councils, a move termed political sleight of hand by those calling for free elections for Parliament. The councils would have no legislative or decision-making authority, officials said, but would instead work as local administrators and troubleshooters. “These councils have no political identity, and they will use the councils to improve Jordan’s image,” said Rohile Gharaibeh, deputy secretary general for the Islamic Action Front, the political party for the Muslim Brotherhood in Jordan. “This will be how they try to distract people.” When the king first moved against Parliament and promised to fix the much maligned election law, many groups praised the decision. As the economy has soured, with unemployment around 13 percent, the legislature has developed a reputation for self-interest and incompetence. It also lacked legitimacy because of accusations of vote-buying and fraud in the last election, though former officials say it was the intelligence service that oversaw the electoral manipulation. Jordan’s actions are nothing out of the ordinary in the Middle East, where kings, emirs, sultans and presidents rely on elected institutions to claim legitimacy and give citizens the perception they have a stake in the direction of the state, political experts said. But those institutions have little independent power or authority. In Egypt, officials in 2006 delayed local elections for two years, saying they would use that time to improve the democratic conditions, though those improvements have not occurred. When Jordan’s king dissolved Parliament, he also instructed the government to ensure that future elections were a “model of transparency and justice.” By doing that, he focused attention on the election law that was put in effect in 1993 by his father, King Hussein. The law shifted control of Parliament away from heavily populated urban centers, with a majority of Palestinians and Islamist supporters, to more rural, tribal-dominated areas. The election law has been preserved over the years because it permitted some degree of public political participation, while allowing the government to preserve a social balance that it sees as essential to keeping Islamists from taking power, and keeping Jordanians of Palestinian origin from winning political control. Of the six million Jordanians, at least half are ethnic Palestinians. Government supporters say changing the law would undermine the identity of the state and diminish the prospects for the two-state solution to the crisis between the Palestinians and the Israelis. But critics contend that the election law has been used as a political tool to protect old-guard interests. “I don’t think that King Hussein, when he designed the election law, thought it would reach the situation we are in today,” said Mustafa Hamarneh, a former director of the Center for Strategic Studies, who now edits a weekly magazine. “But there are conservatives who believe that this is the best way to maintain stability.” For the moment, the king has focused on the day-to-day management of a struggling economy. The national debt is headed toward $14 billion this year at the same time that the economy is contracting as a result of the global financial crisis. The king rolled out his final reshuffling on Monday, when he swore in a new prime minister, Samir Rifai, 43, a businessman and former palace adviser. Referring to the flurry of royal decisions, Musa Maaytah, Jordan’s minister of political development, said, “The most important thing now is how to develop political life and increase the participation of citizens.” Mr. Maaytah holds a post that Jordan says was created to demonstrate the kingdom’s commitment to improving the political environment. But the ministry is also seen as the weakest in the cabinet, political analysts said, a perception underscored in part by there having been seven ministers in the six years the post has existed. Mr. Maaytah said he hoped the situation in Jordan would improve, but acknowledged that the jury was still out. “I was against dissolving the Parliament,” he conceded. Mona El-Naggar contributed reporting.

Citizen of Democratic Country
Citizen of Democratic Country

HELL ****! I thought politics in my country is hell bad. but, reading the news that his grandpa, his father and he himself are PMs, i found that, this is s***! And, his father is counsel of honorary and he is the PM is something real bull****! Shit on those corrupt people! Yalla7 boi....

Mazen
Mazen

Dear Nas, I have placed a blog on your site since around 2 months or so ref my ordeal with obtaining my JOrdanian Nationality. I'm thankful for your offer to assist me and I did supply you with all the supporting documents. I had planned and executed an investment of 4 million JOD on airport grounds fopr Jordan (you know my full story by now). I spent 15 years in my company and chose to come to Jordan; his Majesty the King was so generous in offering me the Jordanian Nationality by means of a 'Royal' instruction and since over a year now. No one in Jordan from X-PM or any of the senior people that heard my story cared even to help, assist or even clarify to me why was I deprived of what is my right.Would you think the new PM would take an interest in giving me my Jordanian Nationality based on the order of His Majesty - or may be you could help in making my voice and case reach his desk..?? You are a free journalist and I respect your blog and your professional way of objectively looking at things; so can I bother you with getting my voice heard..!!! Thanks

mo
mo

"The study, which was conducted by the National Centre for Human Rights (NCHR), categorised the country’s 15 political parties into four groups - Islamists, nationalists, leftists and moderates. " pretending jordan has political parties .. thats cute

susie
susie

This is the article that gave me cause to reinforce some of my concerns. It was in the Jordan Times of the 21st December I have not as yet seen the actual report and I do not known if it will be available in the public domain, but I found this report interesting and worrying. By Hani Hazaimeh AMMAN - The Kingdom's Islamist parties are the least concerned with human rights among other political parties in the country, according to a study revealed on Sunday. The study, which was conducted by the National Centre for Human Rights (NCHR), categorised the country's 15 political parties into four groups - Islamists, nationalists, leftists and moderates. It used a content analysis methodology that reviewed each party's agenda, principles and objectives as well as their activities to assess the extent to which they focus on human rights, said Nitham Barakat, who headed the team that compiled the study........................The 102-page study showed that Islamic parties' charters made the least mention of equality, accounting for only 13.64 per cent of all references to equality in party charters. In comparison, moderate parties accounted for 33.64 per cent of such references...........................Barakat explained that the founding documents of leftist and Islamic parties do not include any references to the right to life, freedom of movement or freedom from torture and cruel treatment, whereas moderate and nationalist parties stress these rights in their agendas......... On another point. If a sense of being disenranchised is a valid excuse for apathy, India might still be ruled by the British, South Africa would be in the thrall of apartheid, and the Czech Republic would still be Czechoslavakia under communist rule. So I totally agree with Yet Another Jordanian@ Making your voice heard isnt just about yelling and typing, its about doing. Making an effort despite whatever obstacles are in the way, to overcome and create solutions to the problems. Nas' recent post also finds a resonance with me.

Yet Another Jordanian
Yet Another Jordanian

I urge you again to read the history of social movements in countries all over the world, just in the past 50 years at least. In order for things to change people have to sacrifice, not just sit and complain. Making your voice heard isnt just about yelling and typing, its about doing. Making an effort despite whatever obstacles are in the way, to overcome and create solutions to the problems. What I am trying to say is that people were scared of Pinochet and his secret police in Chile and the dictatorship in Argentina but the mothers of Plaza De Mayo went out and demonstrated and demanded to know what happened to their songs despite knowing that they might face the same fate as their children. Thankfully I don't think anyone has to face such a fate in Jordan, but there needs to be an active civil society in order for things to change. Most of our civil society organizations and efforts are non-political, but they still benefit the lives of everyday Jordanians and make a difference. It doesn’t have to be politically charged in order for things to change in a benificial way to the population. Democracy isnt going to be the solution to all of Jordan’s problems I'm sorry to say. Communism might have been a great idea, but whose been able to implement it properly? They have democracy in the US but they still have an active civil society element that fills in for where the government doesnt/can/wont etc. The argument that there has to be democracy for civil society to be active and thrive is wrong and history has proven that over and over. I've lived in a democracy for many years and I've seen its flaws. In Development Economics, there has to be a triggering factor for an economy to get out of its unproductive cycle, I was taught that started with the need for entrepreneurs to go out and take risks and start enterprises. Debating that is another issue but the point there is that there needs to be a trigger, and that trigger isnt going to be effortless and free, it might have a cost, but when has anything ever been free in this world?

mo
mo

“perhaps .. but none of those have anything to do with politics so i dont get how its relevant to what we are talking about” our failure to connect those socially transforming ideas (and many others) to the larger political picture is one of the biggest sources for our current malaise and our acquiescent natures. -------- if any of those groups got political and started getting "ideas" .. dont you agree that someone would start listening in on their conversations .. maybe call in their president to have a little chat .. what im trying to say is that we (the people) are not lazy or aqueiscent or whatever else .. we are just scared of what might happen if we decided to say something .. we are terrified of what might happen if we "got involved" .. the prevalent attitude is "بمشي الحيط الحيط ويارب الستر" .. ill give u a personal example .. during the war on gaza .. i live in riyadh .. now protests are banned in ksa .. forget about expatriates in saudi .. do you think the saudi ppl didnt want to protest .. i assure u that they did .. but they were scared of what might happen if they did .. the state went so far as to prod the mufti to declare that protests are wrong .. so it all boils down to this .. change must come from the people .. no doubt about that .. but the people are too scared to do anything .. this environment of fear has been created by the state .. so unless the people grow some balls .. the status quo is going to continue .. take iran's protestors as an example .. they get beaten they get arrested they even get killed .. but they have balls .. however i admit they have the media coverage working for them .. if the same protests happened in a country that the US considers an ally the coverage would definitely not be the same .. but still ..

Mohanned
Mohanned

" in the sense that they serve the government’s purpose. im not sure that’s true, especially when considering their history in the country and the region." If by purpose you mean prviding social services in the land of the "7ashd an reba6" then yeah. They simply thrived for being there at the right time in the right place. They built on their initial success that was a direct result of the government support and protection. One can look at their status in egypt to compare..And don't forget the relationship between king hussein and abdulnaser..We drifted way beyond the original purpose, but I felt the urge to clarify..

Nas
Nas

@mo: "my point is this .. while i agree with the notion that the change must come from the people, it appears to me that the laws and policies in place also agree with this and therefore make every effort to snuff out any kind of initiative from the people .." i agree with you in principle, and those laws need to be seriously re-examined no doubt. the trouble is, to get something positive done; to create real social change, does not require a protest or a permission slip from the governor. we need to start looking at social movements as being strictly political and strictly as something that will illicit the bashing of heads from the state's police force. and although i dont want to get in to a discussion about police brutality, i should point out that while it does exist, of the hundred plus protests that ive been to in jordan over the past decade, the majority of fights tend to start with a protester throwing a stone at a policeman, followed by the group organizer yelling at him to fall back, followed by others throwing things, followed by the police captain getting fed up. again, im not saying that this happens in all cases, just the overwhelming majority of the political protests ive seen that have led to that (the majority of licensed protests do not end with anyone being beaten so let's not confuse jordan with egypt). "and thats exactly why they are considered public enemy #1 by the state … do you think the state will allow another ikhwan to appear .. by another ikhwan i dont mean another body that shares their ideology .. just one that shares their organization and influence" i think mohanned's argument was that the ikhwan exist because the government allows them to, in the sense that they serve the government's purpose. im not sure that's true, especially when considering their history in the country and the region. that said, there are a multitude of religious and non-religious organizations that already exist on the ground that are not associated with the ikhwan. all of them are allowed to operate and ive researched, spoken to, interviewed and worked with a few in recent years. what makes the ikhwan strictly unique in this sense is their long history of social activism, and of course their numbers - outmatching anything else that's available. again, the reason i mentioned them in the first place is not because of their politics nor their religious convictions, but their ability to mobilize and create an unrivaled organization when it comes to social activism in their respective communities (and they are many). this social movement has had its impact on a religious and political level within these communities and depending where one stands, this may be seen as positive or negative. what cannot be denied as that they have managed to have an enormous social impact despite the obstacles set up by the system and the state that we constantly complain about. if they had simply sat down and said, you know what, there's nothing we can do because the system is against us and the country's leadership is against us and everyone is corrupt and everything is terrible - then the social power base they have now would be non-existent. they exist not merely in light of the system's obstacles but because of them. "perhaps .. but none of those have anything to do with politics so i dont get how its relevant to what we are talking about" our failure to connect those socially transforming ideas (and many others) to the larger political picture is one of the biggest sources for our current malaise and our acquiescent natures. --------- @susie: i haven't read it but it would be great if you wrote something about it and published it on 7iber.com

Ameera
Ameera

I don't think what Susie wrote was naive.. I think the point is that change can come from many different elements and these changes combined can transform the society and government to something better. If everyone is waiting for the other side to change first, we will stand still forever.. Plus, great people are not great because they did what other people expected them to do. They are unique and inspirational because they did what most people didn't expect them to do. So why not do something good for your country even if you feel that your country was not good to you? if you don't do anything, nothing will ever change.

observer
observer

Susie , I think what you wrote is naive. As someone living in a democratic state I can tell you that first citizens need to feel that they have a say in who's leading the country, that they can influence and have a say in the decisions taken regarding the political, economic, social aspects of the state they live in before they'd want to start volunteering and taking intiatives like cleaning forrests etc., which in no way can change that that grim reality. If the leaders of a state are not elected by its citizens in free elections, are not accountable in anyway to the citizens, enjoy much higher standard of living compared to most citizens, this creates detachment between the citizens and the state. Is it really the citizens' state? they don't have any control or say in how the state is run. Leaders come and go without them able to control it. Why would they have the motivation to do something for the state? Doing something for the state is like cooperating with the existing political structure and helping it. When there is such injustice - that they are exculded from the political, social, economical desicion making processes - why would they want to be good citizens? They have a right to be angry, and when someone is angry, he or she doesn't feel like volunteering to clean forrests or do anything helpful...

mo
mo

susie said ... I do not believe that official authorisation is needed to start Parent Teacher organisations, voluntary self help groups, book clubs, choral or debating societies, support groups for hospitals, orphanages, prisons, rehabiltation centres and such like, nor for cleaning up a forest, or an archaelogical site, etc etc. perhaps .. but none of those have anything to do with politics so i dont get how its relevant to what we are talking about

susie
susie

In keeping with Nas' argument that people must also start to help themselves. I do not believe that official authorisation is needed to start Parent Teacher organisations, voluntary self help groups, book clubs, choral or debating societies, support groups for hospitals, orphanages, prisons, rehabiltation centres and such like, nor for cleaning up a forest, or an archaelogical site, etc etc. A lot of these are noe emeraging, but nearly eough, and not nearly fast enough. I have noticed that when people do get together publically, in the large majority of cases it seems to that their sole aim is to nullify Jordan's peace treaty with Israel and picket the Israeli Embassy. Obviously, they are not going anywhwere soon with that line of thinking, but that should not stop them from working in other areas of national and public good. Having worked in the voluntary field here for many decades I am saddened that prortionally to our population, so many of the people who want to work simply for altruistic reasons are often foreigners. Remember what JFK said....." ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country."

Yet Another Jordanian
Yet Another Jordanian

I encourage some of you to read up on Social Movements around the world, you will be surprized by what others have faced in order to make change...

susie
susie

Has anyone read the report on the recent study conducted by the National Centre for Human Rights ? It has some worrying istatistics, to me at least.

mo
mo

nas said "the muslim brotherhood is the perfect example of a social body that organized itself, funded itself, maintained itself, and empowered itself not only in the absence of government but despite the obstacles the government put up for them specifically. whether we agree with their politics and beliefs is besides the point. the point is that they did not wait around for the government to give them anything, they did it themselves, empowering thousands in the process. " and thats exactly why they are considered public enemy #1 by the state ... do you think the state will allow another ikhwan to appear .. by another ikhwan i dont mean another body that shares their ideology .. just one that shares their organization and influence

mo
mo

i didnt read all the comments to be honest .. but i saw ppl saying that we shouldnt blame the leadership that the people are responsible too .. ok but .. whenever people try to do something they always end up getting beaten .. how about the law that they have to get approval from the governor before any kind of assembly .. my point is this .. while i agree with the notion that the change must come from the people, it appears to me that the laws and policies in place also agree with this and therefore make every effort to snuff out any kind of initiative from the people ..

Nas
Nas

"Your logic kinda reminds of this .." yeah, i dont get it. but here's a thought, instead of trying to draw analogies, it's healthier if you just enter the debate with your arguments which we can dissect respectfully. casting stones from the sidelines never helps :-) thanks

Sam
Sam

منقول الملك يغادر ارض الوطن في زيارة خاصة (بترا) - غادر جلالة الملك عبدالله الثاني ارض الوطن الجمعة في زيارة خاصة.وادى سمو الامير فيصل بن الحسين اليمين الدستورية بحضور هيئة الوزارة نائبا لجلالة الملك الملك لا يقول لشعبه ما مناسبة هذه الزيارة الخاصة ... واين سيقضيها ؟ ولماذا الان ؟ الملك قام خلال هذا العام ب 43 اجازة خاصة قضاها في الخارج على نفقة الشعب الاردني واصطحب معه زوجته واهلها وصديقاتها كما اصطحب اصدقائه واستأجر شاليهات ويخوت فاخرة وشملت زياراته الخاصة التزلج في كولورادو ولعب القمار في لاس فيغاس وكازينو لندن وزيارة مزرعة للخمور ... هذا طبعا عدا عن الزيارات التي تأخذ طابعا رسميا بحجة القاء محاضرة هنا او زيارة جامعة هناك وهذه ايضا تتحول بعد نصف ساعة الى اجازة خاصة وللمقارنة فقط ... ملك المغرب لم يغادر مملكته خلال الفترة نفسها الا مرتين في زيارات رسمية ولم يظهر مع زوجته بملابس داخلية كما ظهر ملك الاردن وهو يشرب بيرة بد لايت في يخت فاخر في ايطاليا قبل اشهر ... الرئيس السوري لم يقم مع زوجته باية زيارة خاصة للخارج ويقضي اجازاته القصيرة مع زوجته اما بحضور مسرحية في حلب او بزيارة منطقة كسب ... الملك عبدالله تفوق حتى على والده الملك حسين ... المرحوم الملك حسين قام خلال السنوات العشر الاخيرة من حكمه ب 12 زيارة فقط وكلها كانت لاسباب مرضية

Sam
Sam

@MUSA "Every population who has ever lived in a banana republic under a corrupt dictator with expensive hobbies has managed to console itself by pointing to a few things (or accomplishments) that create the illusion that they are not living under a corrupt autocratic regime." One of the most powerful statements I've ever read .. You should write a book. Seriously. @ NAS Your logic kinda reminds of this .. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- JENNINGS: Excuse me for interrupting. Who decides democratic maturity? Who is --. ABDULLAH: The people. JENNINGS: -- as of now, you decide democratic maturity? ABDULLAH: Well in this particular position, we formed the government, that the parliament is elected by the people. But to encourage that, I mean, I have been in discussions with parliamentarians that would it be stronger for you to create where you stand on issues of education, social services, et cetera, et cetera, so that you can create a political party so that in the future, the people actually pick you for where you stand, and not because you happen to be a cousin or a tribal member? ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Nas
Nas

"Continue,,,and I would use it from time to time." .........??

The Free Jordanian
The Free Jordanian

Propognda is not only state property, people companies ,leaders and indivdual like you and I

Nas
Nas

@free jordanian: "I never uttered the word state or government propaganda in my comment" then how do you define propaganda in the context you used it? "A Good journalist would run a correction immediately.." i am not a journalist nor do i claim to be one

Nas
Nas

"The system is killing our abilities. The system is making us disengaged objects. The system is exporting us abroad. The system is not handing us anything for the sake of our advancement. The system only cares about maintaining itself." if this is true then we should assume that any social reform on the ground level must happen despite the presence of the system. to me, that is the very definition of an organic social movement. that's what's needed. it's happened all over the world. "in my opinion it is only the first step. to excercise freedom of speech. to demand accountability. To ask for checks and balances. to focus the attention on what is imprtant." this is where i have trouble. i agree with this premise as any sane person would, but i also live in this environment; this environment where i see the majority of people not accountable for their own actions. the cheating, the fraud, the robbery, the disregard of ethics, etc. getting the simplest of tasks done in jordan is a whirlwind of trouble because you have to deal with employees (private or public) who have no work ethic. unfortunately they represent a majority but i use this as an example to say, yeah, i'd love to see accountability on the executive level, but what about the millions underneath? good leaderships helps but it can only do so much to change the core values in a people. "social change takes time…protecting our country can’t wait." yes, but in my opinion it is a pre-requisite. you can have all the free elections you want, but without genuine social reform you will not only yield unfortunate results but the people will remain generally apathetic.

The Free Jordanian
The Free Jordanian

" a sentiment echoed by the Free Jordanian above when referring to my opinions as state propaganda even though i do not work for the state and frequently speak out against the state when i deem it necessary. this in itself is a lack of our own maturity and selfishness: " Come on Nas , This is just pure misrepresentation of I wrote and one could argue it's out right disinformation about fellow blogger, my comments speak loud and clear and what I have written in your blog and let me quote my self to clarify to the people and particularly to you Nassem "What a piece of propaganda Nas,,, you must be kidding me ,,you know and i know that what you wrote is false ," This is what I wrote no more or less I never uttered the word state or government propaganda in my comment ,so I didn't know where you came up with this ? A Good journalist would run a correction immediately..

Mohanned
Mohanned

"that there is always a single person to blame. that there is always a single element at play. a single factor at work. " Often,the blame falls on the leadership. But no one said that there is always a single element at play or work. To measure something you need to specify what is at work. To assign accountability you need to identify the factors at play. " i feel it is the people who need to start doing something in order to fulfill their own destinies, instead of waiting around for the government to hand it to them. " Great..But to fulfill a destiny one needs to believe in his/her ability. The ability to make something happen. The ability to affect something, say for example the ability to endure injustice and the absence of fairness. the ability to get up everytime the system lets you down due to its "limited resources"..The system is killing our abilities. The system is making us disengaged objects. The system is exporting us abroad. The system is not handing us anything for the sake of our advancement. The system only cares about maintaining itself. "in your opinion, that social action that i am talking about is really just speaking up." in my opinion it is only the first step. to excercise freedom of speech. to demand accountability. To ask for checks and balances. to focus the attention on what is imprtant. we are at a point where slow change and action will be of no good, we are on the path of becoming more broke than we have ever been, maybe another 1989 is knocking our doors..So yeah, grass roots movement are great, I love them, but for the specific time we now live in, we need swift attention and action. Plus, I didn't mean attack in the offensive sense, but rather in the "being too focused on one thing" sense..we are not disagreeing on the ultimate goal, we simply differ in the means we feel are more suitable for dealing with the issues facing our nation at the time being.. I feel that there is a need to differentiate between a regime and a state. we need to make clearer the definition of terms such as loyalty,state, leadership, accountabilyt and such..and i feel that such issues need immediate attention, attention that we can only get if we talk louder..social change takes time...protecting our country can't wait.

Nas
Nas

@Mohanned: "The whole point is that at some point in the comments the blame shifted from the “managers” to the people as if they are the ones leading the nation and for me this is insulting to both the people and the readers intelligence. If you think that by telling people that they only have themselves to blame that somehow they will become more engaged you are only kidding youself." see this is the problem i have with such arguments, the need to paint everything in a single color. that there is always a single person to blame. that there is always a single element at play. a single factor at work. i am not blaming anyone for anything. i am simply saying that a country, specifically our own, is made up of many variables. when it comes to advancement, i do agree that the leadership has yet to sign definite signs of success, but my focus is on the social element because i feel it is the people who need to start doing something in order to fulfill their own destinies, instead of waiting around for the government to hand it to them. in your opinion, that social action that i am talking about is really just speaking up. that's fine. if that's your thing, god bless. in my opinion it will do little (bassem awadallah was not removed to the increased voices of the people but rather the old guard). in my opinion a lot more work on the ground needs to be done to have genuine progress. whether within ourselves, our family unit, our neighborhood, our block, our community, our city, our governorate, etc. some change agents are there, but again, not nearly enough. even our social movements lack real leadership. lastly, i am not attacking you for "being too critical"...heck, im not even attacking you. we're having a debate here and a debate usually has two sides. preferably those two sides don't resort to simply negating the others' argument because they don't agree with it, but rather show considerations when need be. the arab default is "either you're with me or you're against me", a sentiment echoed by the Free Jordanian above when referring to my opinions as state propaganda even though i do not work for the state and frequently speak out against the state when i deem it necessary. this in itself is a lack of our own maturity and selfishness: the idea that only one person is wrong and thus everyone else is wrong. we draw lines in the sand and divide ourselves as our colonialists taught us to do, even if we are working towards the same ultimate purpose.

Mohanned
Mohanned

Plus I find it curious that the debate shifted somehow to a party defending its right to critisize, while the other party is attacking the critics for not doing enough and being too critical..I mean, this is just classic..However what became missing from the picture are the string holders!

Mohanned
Mohanned

The whole point is that at some point in the comments the blame shifted from the "managers" to the people as if they are the ones leading the nation and for me this is insulting to both the people and the readers intelligence. If you think that by telling people that they only have themselves to blame that somehow they will become more engaged you are only kidding youself. You have to start by providing them with the knowledge of what is happening in the their country. You have to let them know that they are loosing their country. You have to let them know where some ppl spend their vacations. You have to let them know that they are being lied to in their face with a smile. "so you believe that by speaking louder and louder the system will just change?" No. I belive that by speaking louder more will hear the voice and thus feel more inclined to do something or at least join the "cursing of the darkness" and trust me, the tipping point will be reached. Remember Basem awadalla and how loud voices got him fired despite him being the king's man? And organized loud voice force got the royal court chief and the second most powerful man in Jordan "fired"... I know it is an anecdote but it is the example that I can remember now.. So yeah loud voices do work, especially in the absence of a system where my voice can be heared through my vote. "in other words, since when do genuine social movements ever adhere to the realities of the status quo, rather than attempt to defy them?" puuurfect..Then how come you justify the absence of true political reform for the fear of the "predictable"?

Nas
Nas

"Exactly, the key word is enviroment" the environment needed to create positive change on the ground is readily available in jordan. the tools are there, the brain power is there, the opportunities are there, even the funding if need be. the environment is difficult to maneuver like most things in jordan but it is, nevertheless, there. the brotherhood is an example but perhaps too big of an example, with too many historic and political connotations. there are many change agents operating in jordan but just not nearly enough. and its certainly not due to government policy. and while i agree the brotherhood has been "enabled" by the government to some extent, we have to acknowledge that this enabling was reluctant and incredibly controlled. in other words, control and containment are better words to use here than "enable". again, the brotherhood is too big an example. a smaller one would be the family unit itself. "When more critical voices spring here and there the sound will get louder and the system will change." so you believe that by speaking louder and louder the system will just change? "The more you know, the more you are inclined to do something.." so do something...that's the point! why are we inclined to say that there's nothing we can do because the system doesn't "let us" or because the environment doesn't "enable us"? why are we satisfied with these excuses? in other words, since when do genuine social movements ever adhere to the realities of the status quo, rather than attempt to defy them? isn't that the whole point?

Mohanned
Mohanned

Susie, Your arguments are selfish, you are OK with taking the rights of others to democratically elect their representatives for the unfounded fear of them maybe taking your rights. As I said earlier in a comment, universal human rights should be granted to each and every jordanian and those rights should be protected by the constitution and the instituitions. If the regime has failed to build such institutions then your blame should shift. Naseem, "the environment does not breed acquiescence but rather movements on the ground level" Exactly, the key word is enviroment. In the west and in the US the enviroment enables, supports and provides resources. They have a system that works for the people not the other way around. They get to choose, we get to shut up. But lets not move to discussing the US educational system and their politics. To look at the IAF from a strictly social aspect is ignoring the bigger picture. The "enviroment" enabled them just like it enabled tribalists and capitalists and political dynasties. Of course by the word enviroment, I mean the system of governing and both its intended and unintended consequences.. "ironically, the people who make the greatest demands are also the people who wholeheartedly believe that the system and the person they are making demands of are failures. and i wonder, if that’s the underlying conclusion that they’ve reached, why are they still cursing the darkness?" You see for us the believers of the system FAILURE, demanding is a way of casting a vote. It is our way of making our voices heard here and abroad. When more critical voices spring here and there the sound will get louder and the system will change. If we speak more, at the end we will have the urge to take corrective action. This is what "cursing the darkness" is all about..It is about building critical mass and pressure..The more you know, the more you are inclined to do something..

susie
susie

Mohanned @And by rational, you mean they vote in a way that fits your vision and the vision of the powers that be No, that is not what I meant. You have no idea what my vision is, and I am not entirely sure what you mean by the vision of the powers that be. I would just like to be sure that my life style is not dictated to by the way other people think and believe to be the only " right " way. I have a very real fear that if certain groupings came to the fore, however democratically, our personal liberties would be curtailed in a manner which I would find difficult to accept. I do not cover my hair . I absolutely accept and respect another woman's decision to cover her hair . But I will not accept to be told that I have to wear hijab, as has been the case recently in Gaza, and is the case in Iran and Saudi Arabia, nor for that matter, would I ban students from wearing a head covering as they do in Turkey. I am an adult and am capable of taking my own decisions. Equally, I do not condone agressively secular life styles which also demand conformity from others. Live and let live is my motto. Live as you want in your private life, and behave with courtesy,respect and integrity in your public life. Full stop. Naseem is absolutely correct in his diagnosis of our national ills.

Nas
Nas

@Mohanned: "It is a cycle naseem, and changing this cycle needs courage, which sadly is lacking. " As I said earlier, our educational system requires massive overhaul, there's no doubt about that. this does not take away from the fact that we have grown virtually acquiescent to this reality. if we take the west as an example, north america is filled with underfunded and disastrous school systems and districts. the environment does not breed acquiescence but rather movements on the ground level. parents form pta committees, they even fund raise to fill their kids' libraries with books. advocacy movements are born. hundreds of moves on the social level are made before the issue ever becomes completely politicized. in jordan, our take is to sit down, complain and pretend our hands are completely tied. "The muslim brotherhood and the regime “share” some goals, eventhough they get at it some time.." yes, yes, we can argue the muslim brotherhood's existence from a million angles and a million theories. im looking at the organization strictly as a social entity that is made up of community leaders, is predominantly self-funded, sustainable, has the ability to mobilize many people and has an enormous social impact in communities where the government is practically non-existence. a quick look at east amman can lead us to this conclusion. and every obstacle the government has ever thrown their way in the name of curtailing or containing their sphere of influence is just one more obstacle they manage to find their way around. "The jordanian society has never been an islamist leaning one..It is only a reaction to what we are being offered by the powers that be." i think that's an under-reading of the political landscape. there are over 30 political parties that cross the political spectrum. the reason why islamists are popular is not because they're the only choice for "jordanians of palestinian origin", but because they are the most organized and most visible in these respective communities where they offer various social services. this is a widely known fact. i am actually conducting on-the-ground research in east amman and 99% of the people i've spoken to all relate this exact sentiment. and by the way, they do have islamist leanings without a doubt and it stretches way beyond the borders of amman and jordan. "So they created the “darak” nashama to deal with the street.." so what? every country in the world has hardcore riot police. the greater the level of authoritarianism the greater the police force. but how has this ever been an obstacle for people who have lived under and transitioned away from authoritarian rule? "It is not the issue of daddy..A daddy genuinely cares about his sons and daughters and doesn’t pay them “kaf sharr” if you will" lol don't take the metaphor to seriously. what i'm pointing out here is that we are constantly asking for things instead of getting things done ourselves. yes, not everything is achievable solely by the people, but we have cultivated a generation of people who are told to ask for things to be given to them. ironically, the people who make the greatest demands are also the people who wholeheartedly believe that the system and the person they are making demands of are failures. and i wonder, if that's the underlying conclusion that they've reached, why are they still cursing the darkness? ------------ @Free Jordanian "Nas,,With all due respect to , I still insist it is a piece of propaganda, I gave an example of how the government would act if I decide to protest, and in return, you came back to me talking about how your feelings got hurt." sigh... if this is what you got from my comment then ive made the crucial mistake of over-estimating your powers of perception.

Passerby
Passerby

Great discussion. I think the most valuable are for NAS and أردني دافع الظرايب and Ahhmad Humeid. The problem lies in the people, and it is time we get serious about our educational system. Public schools are a national disaster in terms of forming the Jordanian identity (think about the oppression, lack of self thinking and self appreciation, think of the teacher who looks like a bus driver and has no respect of him/her self. Enough with the broken record that Jordan is poor of natural resources, guess what? We are not the only country! But many are doing just fine. It is time to build an institutional country and not a circumstantial country where qualifications come first. Jordan was pioneer in many sectors many decades ago, we can still do it.

Mohanned
Mohanned

Susie, So basically it boils down to this: keep the current system until the jordanian ppl are able to vote "rationally". And by rational, you mean they vote in a way that fits your vision and the vision of the powers that be. You and naseem predict the outcomes based on your limited experience and thus argue for maintaining the status quo,or at least waiting until we jordanians become "rational" and more politically and socially sophisticated. You contradict yourself and destroy your own argument in your comment by describing jordanians as selfish. Voters all over the globe vote based on personal interest and beliefs, so we are not the exception. "selfish" voters are not necessarily "irrational' and they form masses based on those "selfish" needs, you know needs like good health care, good retirement future, good education, fair treatment, having a say in their present, future and such..How selfish and irrational of them..The system in place is set to nurture nepotism, tribal loyalties and division. change the system and the outcomes will sure change. The last parliment representes 10% of the jordanian population at best, and this is intentional. There is major flaw in our governing system which is the lack of accountability and transperancy at ALL levels, and by all I mean ALL. In all democracies leadership that doesn't deliver is voted out, here upon failure of delivery we get a "reshuffle" and the leadership goes unaccountable..You know because we are a country with limited resources(Pun intended). Demand accountability and keep pushing the envelope, that is what each of us should keep doing, not advancing the same ol' arguments of "oasis of peace" and "limited resources".

The Free Jordanian
The Free Jordanian

Nas,,With all due respect to , I still insist it is a piece of propaganda, I gave an example of how the government would act if I decide to protest, and in return, you came back to me talking about how your feelings got hurt. Your felling and mine are irrelevant to this very serious and important discussion and debate, I never ask anybody to agree with me in your blog or mine and several times in my blog, people will call me all kind of names and use all kind profanity and insults toward me and that's fine with me, because I learned long time ago that I have to wear thick skin in order to engage them even if they don't adhere to my ideas.

Musa
Musa

It is really amusing how the blame shifted from (or at least was split between) the autocratic corrupt regime to those toiling under it – who by the way happen to be socially retarded, apathetic, illiterate, passive, and would not know how to deal with democracy if it was delivered to them on a royal platter. Abdel Karim Qassim's personal translator Abdul Mon'em al-Khatib once quoted Somerset Maugham who described a failed political leader as a horse pulling a carriage down a steep slope. After a while one can't tell if the horse is pulling the carriage or vice-versa, but they are both rolling together downhill. From a slightly more obscure source, there is the story of the reckless bus driver who keeps yelling at the passengers who are not doing a good job riding the out-of-control bus. Ahmad: Every population who has ever lived in a banana republic under a corrupt dictator with expensive hobbies has managed to console itself by pointing to a few things (or accomplishments) that create the illusion that they are not living under a corrupt autocratic regime. People in Swaziland can point to the fact that the external debt burden has declined markedly over the last 20 years, and domestic debt is almost negligible.

susie
susie

I salute Naseem as I think he has hit every appropriate nail on the head. Has anyone ever come across the saying "every people gets the government they deserves ?" Jordanians on the whole are apathetic so long as they are alright Jack. They are blinkered to a very large degree as to the world around them and judge most things simply from the their personal point of view . Education, or lack of it certainly plays a very large part in creating this state of affairs, but there is as Nas says, a very real problem in the lack of maturity and altrusim with with the average Jordanian thinks and acts. Mohannad@I would go further and call it an elitest and unethical question at best. When there is a parliament in session, there are usually parliamentary sub committees on Education, Foreign Affairs, Agriculture etc. Hand on heart, is it not true that most of of the members of these committee have not the slightest idea of the broader picture. Most issues are looked at from either a narrow, very chauvanistic, increasily religiously conservative attitude, or from a highly politicised stand where everything begins and ends with the Palestinian tragedy. I would like issues to be debated and judged on individual merit, not a "one size fits all " manner. I sometimes fear that there are many who would exploit "democratic" means to bring in a most undemocratic form of government, or more precisely, lifestyle. Look at Iran. It is important to learn from history.

Mohanned
Mohanned

naseem, seems my comment got stuck in the moderation que..

Nas
Nas

@yazan: "Jordanians are expected to live with they are told and given…..FACT." absolutely true. however, expectations can always be defied by changing realities. "Any one who expresses a differenrt point of view is labelled against the government and HM……FACT." absolutely true. as is the opposite of this statement. "The Media in Jordan does not help matters, the likes of Wakeel making out he is making a difference in his morning shows is absolutely absurd, furthermore his laugh is really annoying…..FACT." no doubt. yet people could care less if he is making a difference; he is a platform that people find credible because they see (or hear of) an outcome "Omar Abdallat and this watani songs obsession we have, creates a kind of anesthesia that makes us forget what is actually going on around us……FACT." absolutely. but no one shoves omar abdallat down the people's throat. he and his music are cherished by (i would argue) a majority, judging simply by the amount of praise his music receives and the fact that he sells more tickets in every venue he plays than anyone else we can think of, to say nothing of taxi anthems.

Mohanned
Mohanned

" are our schools the only resource of knowledge available to us?" For many ppl yes. " how many jordanians read books outside their school curriculum? how many use the internet for purposes other than accessing pornography or copying/pasting materials for their school work?" Schools are central to the issues mentioned above. When the public university admission system is designed to co-opt a certain segment of the jordanian society, where the unqualified end up teaching our kids in our schools, where the same teachers are paid nickles and dimes, where the 50 kids sit in the same room, where relegion is given more emphasis than science, where critical thinking is discouraged,etc....It is a cycle naseem, and changing this cycle needs courage, which sadly is lacking. "how many parents are actually encouraging their kids to pursue knowledge in all its forms? " The same parents are the product of the same schooling system. The muslim brotherhood and the regime "share" some goals, eventhough they get at it some time..For the them jordan is "ard 7ashd wa reba6" thus it is only a part of the larger islamic agenda..So the now for them is not as important as their envisioned future. The regime in the 60's enabled the islamists to counter the leftist powers, the regime gave them control of the educational system. so yeah they are part of the problem, but they are being enabled by the the powers that be, they serve them well, and they are the perfect "bo3bo3"... Also, your categorization of islamists vs tribals is flawed. Tribalists are simply trying to protect their "affirmative action" benefits, and the regime knows that..For example, neyef el qadi remained in the government to signal something for those, the royal vistis to tribes,etc....you get the idea... Islamists are the only choice left for the marginalized jordanian of palastenian origins, they have no choice.either they accept only having some economic rights with no political ones or they vote for islamists..Of course I am not generalizing, but thats my read of the issue. The jordanian society has never been an islamist leaning one..It is only a reaction to what we are being offered by the powers that be. "my argument boils down to the fact that i believe real change should not come from up top but from down below on the street level." So they created the "darak" nashama to deal with the street.. " otherwise, we’re just waiting around for daddy to give us our allowance instead of going out and making a living." It is not the issue of daddy..A daddy genuinely cares about his sons and daughters and doesn't pay them "kaf sharr" if you will..Ask the Iraqi "awakening" consultants who were taught the lesson well.."Ta3mi el thom testa7i ma ba3raf shoo"..

Yazan Al-Majali
Yazan Al-Majali

Jordanians are expected to live with they are told and given.....FACT. Any one who expresses a differenrt point of view is labelled against the government and HM......FACT. The Media in Jordan does not help matters, the likes of Wakeel making out he is making a difference in his morning shows is absolutely absurd, furthermore his laugh is really annoying.....FACT. Omar Abdallat and this watani songs obsession we have, creates a kind of anesthesia that makes us forget what is actually going on around us......FACT.

Nas
Nas

"but how if schools and unis teach conformity to power-unis which are supposed to be where political views are formed and nurtured. How?" no doubt that this is true. but emphasis on "supposed to be". when you don't have the ideal you have to deal with the reality. if our educational systems don't help us, we have to ask why we're not helping ourselves. are our schools the only resource of knowledge available to us? how many jordanians read books outside their school curriculum? how many use the internet for purposes other than accessing pornography or copying/pasting materials for their school work? how many parents are actually encouraging their kids to pursue knowledge in all its forms? how many of them are even aware or involved in any way when it comes to school work? can you see the trickle-down effect here, and how widespread it is? "Besides you seem to intentionally seem to “forget” that the government is the only organized body which is able to “deliver” in Jordan" To deliver what? public services? visit any jabal in east amman where the majority of the capital's population lives and you'll find that the biggest organized body that delivers services is NOT the government but the Muslim Brotherhood. and the people who operate its various entities in any given jabal are almost always made up of the residents in the area. doctors volunteer or get paid minimal amounts to work in neighborhood clinics (which are cheaper than the government's), as do lawyers and teachers. the muslim brotherhood is the perfect example of a social body that organized itself, funded itself, maintained itself, and empowered itself not only in the absence of government but despite the obstacles the government put up for them specifically. whether we agree with their politics and beliefs is besides the point. the point is that they did not wait around for the government to give them anything, they did it themselves, empowering thousands in the process. "If that number increases and the group of ones from each five thousand decide to organize, they will be taken somewhere and “talken to”, if you will." political activists, probably, social activists, rarely if ever. ive known of no social activist in jordan that has been "talked to" by the government, and if they have, it only tends to strengthen their resolve. i would include myself in that category having been "talked to" before and continuing regardless. these talks are merely one obstacle that occur once in a blue moon. again, the problems and obstacles social activists and changemakers face on a daily basis tend to come from the people themselves first, followed by government bodies second. that's my argument here. "Do we accept failure just because we “fear” the predictable?" I agree with all of your aforementioned statements. I agree that the people need to be granted their universal human rights. I agree with having free elections. I agree with use being able to govern ourselves and the ability to maintain our own institutions. however, i also realize that our population is divided between those who are tribal and those have islamist leanings, with the rest being too insignificant a number to present any real political power. while i am personally uninterested in having either of these groups govern me (both of which would likely set up a dictatorship in the end), my opinion does not matter. what matters is that neither party would be able to successfully maneuver through the political complexities of this region, nor govern fairly domestically. they have 60 years of rhetoric to back that up. our qualms with the regime and state of affairs are valid. and like i said, i agree with you on the essentials. my argument boils down to the fact that i believe real change should not come from up top but from down below on the street level. i believe that genuine social change is what induces, if not forces, genuine political change on the executive level. otherwise, we're just waiting around for daddy to give us our allowance instead of going out and making a living.

Mohanned
Mohanned

Naseem, You still didn't give me an answer to your proposed way of creating change? I think your main argument is that people need to be more engaged, but how if schools and unis teach conformity to power-unis which are supposed to be where political views are formed and nurtured. How? When the leadership contradcits itself everytime it advances reform? I think its fair to say that it is a trickle down schizophrenia. Besides you seem to intentionally seem to "forget" that the government is the only organized body which is able to "deliver" in Jordan, and this is not the making of chance but rather a deliberate effort on the part of the government and the leadership to prevent any change movement from reaching critical mass in the fear of the coming tipping point. and to prove ur point I will use your own words: "for every 5,000 people that are complaining and criticizing in jordan, i encounter perhaps one changemaker at best. that number needs to increase." If that number increases and the group of ones from each five thousand decide to organize, they will be taken somewhere and "talken to", if you will. Then you come back to the "predictable" outcomes "argument"? What are your predictions? Why don't the leadership with the absolute power "grant" universal human rights to the citizens of Jordan? Why do we have to say that the outcomes of democratic reform are predictable when the outcomes of 60 years of the same policy of governing are facts on the ground and they are utter failures? Do we accept failure just because we "fear" the predictable? This is the definition of a defeatest attitude. If in 60 years of absolute power the leadership failed to build institutions that are able of protecting the state and our rights then what naseem? If the institution are only there to maintain the regime and not the state then what naseem? Come on man!

Nas
Nas

The Free Jordanian: Thank you for providing me with a clear cut example of what I'm talking about. You ask for freedom of speech and freedom of expression - and in your case you desire to exercise them by going to protest at the Israeli embassy - but then you completely negate my opinion by disrespectfully labeling it as "propaganda". In other words, freedom of speech and expression should be allowed, but as long as we all agree with you and your opinions. In other words, I should be expected to fully respect your opinion and allow you the space to express yourself freely on my blog, but I should also expect that that same courtesy not be returned to me. Your perception and approach to free speech and expression is no different from how the majority of Jordanians behave. Lastly, regarding the sentence that you quoted me, if you don't think that's an accurate statement then I can conclude that you have never truly attempted to do something positive for your country or that you know of few people who have. There is absolutely no doubt that we have serious problems when it comes to the political state in this country, much of which has been outlined in my original post and in the comments that followed. However, we, as the people, have always been the biggest obstacle to our own positive change. The state always comes in second. And a critical analysis of one's own immediate environment would lead to that conclusion.

The Free Jordanian
The Free Jordanian

Nas,, Here is a debate on what have you said just listen and watch

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  2. [...] a side note: For anyone interested in Jordanian politics, this post up at The Black Iris – and the comments – should be your read of the week. [...]